Name that Plane

Aerospace Manufacturing and Design welcomes all aircraft enthusiasts to join in the fun and NAME THAT PLANE! Each issue, a new aircraft will be featured in the Aviation Appreciation section. Given a photo and a clue box, readers are encouraged to guess which plane is being described and send in their answers to the AMD staff.

Aerospace Manufacturing and Design welcomes all aircraft enthusiasts to join in the fun and NAME THAT PLANE! Each issue, a new aircraft will be featured in the Aviation Appreciation section. Given a photo and a clue box, readers are encouraged to guess which plane is being described and send in their answers to the AMD staff.

Rapid-fire Facts:
  • First prototype flown February 24, 1935
  • Initial military deliveries in late 1936
  • Originally designed as a commercial airliner
  • Converted into a bomber and used in early part of WWII
  • By the end of WWII, mainly used for transport only
  • Over 7,300 produced

Specifications

  • Wingspan: 74 ft. 1¾ in.
  • Length: 53 ft. 9½ in.
  • Height: 13 ft. 1¼ in.
  • Empty Weight: 19,136 lbs.
  • Top Speed: 270 mph
  • Engine/Horsepower: 2 Junkers Jumo 211F-1 1350hp engines

Previous Issue's Winner

1st Place: Leon Hertzson, President Product Development Labs East Northport, NY

How long have you been in your current industry?
I founded two companies, first in 1962 and the second in 1980. My current company was incorporated in 1992.

How did you become interested in aircraft?
My older brothers were champions in the model aircraft field in the 1930s and we became a team after WWII. We competed in national and international contests and were most successful in winning awards. We all designed our own flying models, which typically outperformed our competitors. I took plane trips (single engine aircraft) when I could and was most impressed with flying in soaring gliders. Later, I worked as a design engineer for Pratt & Whitney on their newly developed JT-8 jet engine.

What is your favorite aircraft?
I find the beauty and elegance of a soaring glider to be my favorite form of flying aircraft. In power planes I think the Lockheed P-38 Lightning had the lines that made it stand out from almost all others.

Previous Issue's Runners-Up

2nd Place: Thomas H. Dixon
Tooling Manager, Pemco Aeroplex
Birmingham, AL

3rd Place: Michael A. Oates
Metallographer, ATK
Promotory, UT

4th Place: David C. Talcott
IT Manager, Mack Tool & Egn.
South Bend, IN

5th Place: Neil A. Ashbaugh
Market Development Specialist,
Oberg Industries, Inc.
Freeport, PA

August 2007
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