Solar Impulse 2 takes off from Japan for Hawaii

Solar Impulse 2 takes off from Japan for Hawaii

The third attempt at five-day flight began June 28; longest leg in planned round-the-world flight.

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June 30, 2015
Manufacturing Group
Electrical/Electronic Industry News Research Motion/Design/Automation
Nagoya, Japan – After two delays due to weather during the past weeks, a possible window for a flight to Hawaii opened on June 28, 2015, and Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) of Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg took off at 18:03 UTC from Nagoya. Borschberg was at the controls for this eighth leg of a planned flight around the world made solely on solar power.
 
Solar Impulse is trying to make a historical oceanic flight that will last at least 5 days and 5 nights non-stop. The attempt to reach Hawaii from Japan to encourage the use of clean technologies is the longest exploration leg of the Solar Impulse’s round-the-world mission. 
 
This flight is demanding and challenging particularly given its duration: 120 hours on solar power only. It is a feat never accomplished before in the world of aviation.
 
At t 8:32am UTC on June 29, the end of Solar day 1, Si2 reached Energy Neutral Evening – the moment it no longer collects energy from the sun and starts using the energy in the batteries. The aircraft descended from 28,000ft down to minimum flight level for the night of 8 000ft.
 
After more than 15 hours into the flight, Borschberg communicated, "Feeling a bit lonely up there, but very excited about the rest of this flight, the moment of truth!"
 
As Day 2 dawned, the live news feed noted, "We passed the point of no return - there is no way back. Now it's Hawaii or bust!" 
 
"The point of no return for this flight to Hawaii was also the point of no return for the entire project," Piccard remarked.